First Aid Kits for Horses: The Alternatives

First Aid Kits for Horses

Did you know that just like us there are first aid kits for horses? A well-stocked first aid kit in your tack room is important. Horse owners should always be prepared for equine injuries and illnesses. While the standard essentials like gauze pads and a thermometer are always helpful, in some situations more unusual items may be the key to helping your horse. First aid kits for horses should be updated periodically. When updating for kit, consider adding these less common items. They could just save your horse’s life.

Unusual Things for Your First Aid Kit

Consider adding the inner tube from a bicycle wheel to your first aid kit. I know that sounds weird, but hear me out. You can cut a bicycle inner tube in half and use it as a tourniquet to help prevent blood loss from a leg injury. This stretchy material can make a great seal to a wound. Flashlights are essential in any first aid kit, but the winter cold will drain their batteries, and holding a flashlight while you’re treating your horse isn’t practical. Glow sticks offer an advantage because they don’t rely on battery power and can be placed anywhere.

Another item that you should always have in your first aid kit is duct tape. It might seem peculiar at first, but there are so many ways duct tape can help in an emergency. Not only is it great for temporary fixes with tack, it can also be used as a temporary bandage. If your looking for more horse safety tips, call us today. Colorado Horse Property is the leading horse property listing site in the entire state.

Horse Riding Safety Apps

Horse Safety Apps

With the summer in full swing in Colorado, horse owners will be taking their four-legged companions out of the pasture. Horse riding safety is very important, especially if you ride regularly. It is safer to have someone ride along with you. However, with social distancing still a main priority, that might not always be possible. It is more important now that ever to note that falling poses a real problem for equestrians. But don’t worry. We’re in the 21st century and technology has your back. The free apps below could help you if you were to fall off your horse and were unable to phone for help.

Safety Apps for Horse Riding

The main app you’ll want to have on your smartphone before riding alone is the Ride With Me app. This app was developed by SmartPak. When you set up Ride With Me, you’ll be prompted to enter in some emergency contacts. The app will monitor your movement and if it detects that you’ve stopped moving, it will sound a warning alarm. If you’ve stopped moving on purpose, then this alarm can be turned off easily. However, if you don’t stop the alarm, the app will text your GPS location to your emergency contacts, letting them know that you need help.

You should also consider the Road ID app. Much like Ride With Me, this app tracks your location as you ride and its Stationary Alert Notification can notify your friends and family if you stop moving. Your emergency contacts can see your progress on any web browser. You can create a lock screen that includes emergency contacts, allergies, medical conditions, and your blood type for emergency responders in case you fall. Looking for horse properties for sale in Colorado, contact Colorado Horse Property today and speak with one of our horse-person realtors.

Can Horses Contract Covid-19?

Pandemic Horse

The pandemic brought on by the novel Coronavirus that is sweeping across the world, has impacted every American is one way or another. The pandemic can also affect our beloved animals. Can horses contract Covid-19? The short answer is no. There are no reported cases. However, the more important question is: how does the Coronavirus affect horses? The Coronavirus affects animals in two different ways, directly and indirectly. The direct way that the pandemic is affecting animals is through contracting the disease Covid-19. This has been reported in a few cases, mostly cats and dogs, though it is very rare. The broader, indirect way that our animals have been affected by this pandemic is due to limited access to supplies and interrupted care.

How To Stay Prepared

In order to reduce the affects of the pandemic on your horses is to stay prepared. Ensure that you have stocked up on extra supplies. This includes medications, forage/feed and other necessities. Stay in contact with your local feed store. If they are open, you may be required to wear a mask and gloves before entering the store. If they are closed, there may be other options for you to stock up on what you need. Talk to your feed store owner about ordering online or by phone, putting your order outside the door of the store as you arrive or other alternatives. Be proactive and less reactive. Write down specific care instructions for your horses. If you get sick, someone will be able to jump in and follow your plan.

If you are sick, you should not go out to collect supplies. Rely on the strong Colorado Horse Community around you. Contact your friends, over the phone of course, and see if they can lend you supplies. They can even help arrange to bring in food to leave at your gates/steps. If you have any other questions about how you can help reduce the affects of the pandemic on horses and other animals, contact Colorado Horse Property today.

Winter Horses

Winter Horses

Horse owners are naturally going to over-prepare their horses for the winter. It’s inevitable. Though closing the barn windows and turning up the heater seems like a good idea, it might not be. All horses are winter horses; they are equipped to handle most winters.

For instance, horses are naturally claustrophobic and their mental well-being suffers when confined. Though they will need to take shelter some times, horses instinctively need open spaces. Standing in a stall for long periods of time can be damaging to your horse’s health. Just like humans, it is not good for horses to be sedentary. It leads to ulcers, colic, and other digestive disorders, not to mention obesity. Good horse owners will know that having some sort of shelter is a must. However, using it should be your horse’s choice, not yours. Winter horses will always take shelter when they need to.

Are Horse Blankets Necessary?

Drive through any horse community in Colorado, like Elizabeth or Salida, during the winter. Some horses will have blankets on and some will not. Putting a blanket on a horse will vary from situation to situation. Overall, your horse’s coat is fully equipped to keep it insulated against the cold in most cases. As long as they can go into their stall during strong winds and wet weather, your horse is able to keep sufficiently warm in the coldest weather. Starting thinking of your horses as winter horses.

So, when are horse blankets necessary? Horses who shiver in the cold, are underweight, aging, ill, or otherwise frail, may feel better with extra covering. However, keep a check on your horse. Are they sweating under the blanket? You don’t want to inhibit your horse’s coat from its natural ability to protect against the cold. So, if your horse is sweating or exhibiting signs of discomfort due to the blanket, make sure to take the blanket off. For more information, contact Colorado Horse Property today.

Green Horsekeeping

Green Horsekeeping

Keeping horses can be very hard on the environment. In order to reduce your strain on the world around you, horse owners should practice green horsekeeping. There are many ways that keeping horses impact the land. Manure, insect sprays, and weed killers on the pasture all can play a role in contaminating local streams and waterways. Here are a few things that you can do to practice green horsekeeping and improve your impact on the world.

One of the most important parts of green horsekeeping is making sure your pasture is in good shape. That means making your pasture healthy and mud-free. Less mud means less standing water, and no more runoff that’s likely to contaminate nearby streams. If your pastures are healthy, they’re also more likely to be weed-free, with a reduced need for toxic herbicides. A single horse can produce as much as 50 pounds of manure per day. That’s nine tons a year. What you do with the manure on your farm is important when it comes to protecting the environment. Composting is an ideal solution because it improves the soil. And then there’s building on your property. Whether you’re just building your barn, are making an addition, or are simply fixing fences, the type of construction you choose is an important environmental decision. Another option to consider is a wood composite. This manmade, wood-like product is made from as much as 65-percent recycled materials, including both recycled wood and plastic.

Colorado is a great place for raising horses. Many Colorado horse properties already have the structures in places, like barns and tack rooms. This makes for an easier transition when moving and makes green horsekeeping possible. If you have questions about horse properties in Colorado, contact one of our horse person realtors today!

Preparing Your Horses For Emergencies

horse emergency

Emergency Planning

No one wants to think about what would happen during a natural disaster. And yet being prepared for the worst is something that every Colorado horse property owner should be doing. If you are a Colorado horse owner, make sure to have a contingency plan in place for your home first. Then prepare a plan for your horses. Your horses are very important, but you have to have your own home in order first. Here is a list (provided by the Redcross) of items that you should have available in case of a horse emergency.

    • Water
    • Non-perishable food
    • Manual can opener
    • Crank or battery-operated flashlight and radio
    • Extra batteries
    • Extra keys for house and vehicles
    • First aid kit
    • Cash in small bills
    • Personal hygiene items
    • Important family documents
    • A copy of your Home Emergency Plan

Horse Emergency

After you have taken care of your own needs, now it’s time to prepare your animals. All of your horses should have a halter and lead rope near their stall. Think about adding extra halters and lead ropes in multiple locations in your stables. Other things that you can do is store extra feed buckets, bedding, pitchforks, shovels, and wheelbarrows. You don’t want to clutter your barn, but having these extra items could come in handy in an emergency. Consider bringing the following:

    • Horse ID papers
    • Horse insurance papers
    • Photographs of your horse with your and your vet’s information
    • Luggage tags with the same information
    • Spray paint or etch the hooves
    • Auction crayons for tagging

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How To Breathe When Colorado Horseback Riding

Colorado horseback riding

Colorado Horseback Riding

Colorado Horse Property would like to expand on our previous article “Effective Breathing When Horseback Riding.” Stress is the worst thing a rider can experience while Colorado horseback riding. Nerves and anxiety can sap a rider and their horse of energy. If you reset your breathing, a few beautiful things will happen. First of all, you will replenish your oxygen stores. Eventually, your mind will become less clouded, and you will be able to make better decisions. When you regain your confidence in the saddle, your riding potential will skyrocket.

The communication between you and your horse comes through your physical connection. If your body becomes impacted by stress, your horse will pick up on that emotion immediately. The more confidence you have while Colorado horseback riding, the more confident your horse will be as well. Learning to breathe correctly is the best tool for regulating stress in the saddle. Effective breathing can reverse the fight-or-flight response, and relax your body. The exact same can be said of your horse. With you and your horse back in control, you can both focus on what’s important.

Stress is known to riddle the mind with unnecessary doubt. That voice in your head, when infested with anxiety, will turn on you quickly. Instead of focusing on what is important, you will worry about everything excessively. When you reset your breath and replenish the oxygen to your brain, it will be easier to think more clearly and purposefully. You will be able to direct your thoughts back to your riding and your goals. This will give you a greater sense of control, which in turn will lead to greater feelings of confidence for you and your horse. For more information, contact a horse-person realtor at Colorado Horse Property.

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Effective Breathing When Horseback Riding

horseback riding

Horseback Riding and Breathing

Breathing is an essential aspect of horseback riding that often gets overlooked. Click the link for trail riding tips and tips on how to saddle a horse; things to know before you get to this stage. After these steps, practice breathing at home before getting into the saddle. First, practice dropping your breathing low. Inhale deeply and then exhale. Your shoulders and chest will drop as you exhale. You are now ready to try while horseback riding.

While on horseback, drop your breathing low. You will feel a better connection with your horse as your body relaxes. With each breath, this connection will become stronger. You can do this exercise at a halt or a slow walk. There are many signs that the activity is helping your horse. Your horse will lower their neck, blow out their nostrils, and the ears will relax. This is known as connecting breathing. This technique is a great tool to add to your routine. When this technique is followed correctly, you and your horse will be starting from a calming place.

Take the time to build up your confidence. Practice makes perfect! Eventually, you will be able to influence your body when you need to the most. Now that you have gained your confidence with the connecting breath, you are ready for the breath reboot. First, slowly inhale and count to six. In turn, slowly exhale for a count of eight. Repeat two to four times. This technique will help you refocus while horseback riding.  Use it at a show when you begin to feel nervous. You will quickly see those nerves fly out the window! For more information contact a horse-person realtor at Colorado Horse Property.

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How To Bond With Your Horse

how to bond with your horse

Bond With Your Horse

Bonding with horses seems to be a fundamental trait that humans have developed over the years. Bonding with horses teaches compassion, patience, and has been shown to reduce stress. So how do you bond with your horse? Colorado Horse Property has put together a list of ways to bond with your horse that you might not have thought of before.

When your horse has to be seen by the vet, don’t take a back seat. Being there during this stressful period for your horse can increase the bond that you already have. So the next time your horse gets diagnostics, dental work, alternative therapies, or even surgery be present. If you are a competition rider, supplement your horse’s training with other activities in the off season. The more time you spend with your horse, the greater your bond will be. The greater the bond, the better your horse will be on and off the track. And don’t abandon your horse when winter comes. Winter can be harsh, especially in the state of Colorado, but your horse needs attention all year round. Put on your winter gear and get outside with your horse—you’ll both be glad you did!

It is common for your horse to show negative behaviors when they get older. Is your horse resisting and showing tension more lately? You could go out and get your horse all new tack and bring in a new trainer. However, this behavior could be the result of your bond with your horse slipping. Don’t feel bad. We all get busy sometimes, but when your horse is showing these signs it is time for you to get busy bonding again. It’s time to address these problems from a new angle, experiment with new techniques, and rebuild the foundation with your horse.

Image by Tatyana Sharnina on Pixabay.

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Head Shyness in Horses

head shyness

Head Shyness?

Have you ever heard of head shyness in horses?  Is your horse averse to any activity/hand placements around the head and/or near his ears? Does your horse hate to be handled with a brush, headstall or clippers around the head? If yes, then your horse might have what is known in the community as head shyness, which is exactly what it sounds like. This is common with horses exchanging owners as in an adoption from a rescue center. For more information on the great horse rescue centers in Colorado, visit our horse rescue centers page.

Don’t worry; if your horse has head shyness, which is natural, there are a few things you can do to reduce your horse’s shyness. Begin any head-touching with a slow rub directly on the head. This will show the horse that you are going to be relaxed and patient. Get horse horse moving prior to trying any head-touching and if they become agitated, then try moving them around again. Twenty to thirty minutes of moving should do it.

The next step that trainers use to address head shyness, is to lead the horse toward something that will cause the horse a little bit of anxiety. This may sound odd at first, but the truth is having a horse move toward what worries them is a great way to build confidence. You can do this by having your horse move towards something it doesn’t like or feels uncomfortable near. With each step toward this anxiety-object, go to the horse’s head and give it a rub with your hand as a reward. Repeating this process a few times will help change your horses perspective on getting its head rubbed and reduce it’s head shyness. If you have any more questions about head shyness or anything else in relation to your horse or horse property, contact Colorado Horse Property for details.

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