How to Rescue A Horse

How to Rescue A Horse

How To Rescue A Horse

Wondering how to rescue a horse? Though there are no set formulas to adopting the right horse for you, it can be a difficult and trying experience that you don’t want to get wrong. To help you on this journey, your friends at Colorado Horse Property has come up with a few this to do in the process of adopting a horse. First things first, take a look at how much it will cost you to care for a horse. The cost of owning and caring for a horse is ongoing, not to mention the initial adoption fees. Ensure that your budget includes boarding, feed, tack, training, veterinary care, and supplements for your horse.

Most people want to adopt horses in order to ride them, but don’t just assume it is as easy as that. First evaluate your riding-skill level. If you’re a beginner, start with a horse that is well-trained and confident, versus an untrained, or newly started horse. Not interested in riding your adopted horse? Know what you’re looking for in your horse. Do you need a horse to ride on occasional short rides? Long trail riding? Are you getting a new horse as a companion to a horse you already have? Knowing what you want before you start the process can help you pin point where to adopt your horse.

Choosing a Rescue and Horse

One of the biggest challenges in adopting a horse is finding the right rescue to go with. Some people are restricted by low numbers of rescues in their state. Luckily for you, you live in the great state of Colorado where horse rescues are plentiful. For a full list of rescues, check out our list of Colorado horse rescues! When choosing, be prepared to answer some of these criterion:

Where do the horses come from in the rescue in question? Does the horse rescue only take in horses that are removed from neglectful situations, or does it take horses from auctions or individuals? Will the rescue share the horse’s health records with you? Can you talk to their veterinarian and get the full narrative on any health issues? Does the rescue have a good reputation in the community? Ask local horse owners, veterinarians, and farriers about the rescue in question, if there are any concerns than these horse related professionals are going to know about them. If you have any more questions on how to rescue a horse, contact Colorado Horse Property today.

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Pigeon Fever, Three Forms

Pigeon Fever

Pigeon Fever

One thing to look out for this year when taking care of your horses is pigeon fever (also known as dryland distemper or Colorado strangles). Pigeon fever develops when a certain type of bacteria enters a horse’s body, probably via insect bites or breaks in the skin. The infection usually causes abscesses in the chest or elsewhere in the horse’s body.

Most horses make a full recovery from pigeon fever, but it can take weeks for the disease to run its course.It is a good idea to become familiar with pigeon fever. Owners should know what it looks like, how it occurs, and when your horse is most likely to get it. Your friends at Colorado Horse Property has done some research and would like to share what we have found.

Three Forms of Pigeon Fever

 

One form of pigeon fever is the development of external abscesses just under the skin or within your horse’s muscles. They are commonly found in the chest and along the middle of the belly. This is the most common and most documented form of the infection and most horses recover fully once the abscess drains and the wound heals.

Another form of this infection causes internal abscesses to develop. This occurs when the bacteria is carried into the body and infect the liver, kidney, lungs or other internal organs. If you suspect that your horse has contracted this type of infection, then make sure to take your animal to the vet as soon as possible. An ultrasound may be needed to locate abscesses, assess their size and determine their maturity.

The last form of pigeon fever causes swelling and ulcerations on the lower legs. These abscesses form within lymph nodes, causing the swelling of the leg. Signs of this form of the infection are lameness, lethargy and loss of appetite. Again, if your animal is showing any of these signs, make sure to take them to the vet as soon as possible.

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Horse Health, Tail Rubbing

Horse Health

Horse Health Problems

Your friends at Colorado Horse Property knows how important horse health is to you horse owners out there. One issue that you might have this year is called Tail Rubbing, in which your horse might rub its tail raw.

There may be several reasons why this is occuring. The most common is pinworms. If you suspect your horse has pinworms, call your veterinarian before starting any treatment, to get their professional opinion. You’ll want to be sure to select a deworming agent that is effective against that parasite in your area. If you live in the Littleton area, then try visiting the Littleton Equine Medical Center for help with this issue.

Finding A Solution

The first thing you are going to want to due when you find that your horse has been tail rubbing, is to check for pinworms These parasites have made a resurgence in North America recently. The eggs trigger itchiness that helps spread them through the environment as the horse rubs against things.

Then you should inspect the tail itself. Separate the hairs to check the skin along the tailbone and lift it to examine the underside as well. The irritation may be due to ticks that should be removed. If the irritation on the skin of the tail is widespread, your horse may have contacted dermatitis.

If the your horse’s tail itself looks fine, check between the hind legs forward to the sheath. This is a prime location for tiny Culicoides midges to feed, which can set off an allergic reaction known as “sweet itch.” These insects also feed along the crest, so affected horses may also rub their necks. For more information on common horse health issues or where to find the nearest horse vet, contact Colorado Horse Property.

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Equine Poison Prevention

Equine Poison Prevention

Equine Poison Prevention

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (more commonly known by the acronym ASPCA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing cruelty to animals. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is based in New York City and got its start in 1866. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ mission is “to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States.” The ASPCA is a leader for equine poison prevention.

Colorado Horse Property wants to take away a little bit of the worry from fellow horse owners who are worried about their horses health. Therefore we want to provide horse owners and enthusiasts with a list of things to look out for.

The experts at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center have compiled the following list of spring and summer threats for horses. If you suspect that your animal has ingested a poisonous substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. For a list of horse clinicians in Colorado, check out our Local Resources page.

Equine Hazards

If you make sure to keep your animals away from the following spring and summer threats, then your horses should make it through to the next season without having to see the veterinarian. Keep your horses away from wilted red maple leaves, black walnuts, and oak leaves. The plant commonly known as the yew should be avoided. The yew comes in different forms all of which are under the taxus species. They include the Japanese yew, American yew, English yew, western yew, oleander and rose laurel.

Stay clear of rhododendrons and azaleas. These are beautiful flowers that most homeowners love, just make sure to put them out of reach of your wandering horse. Also stay away from white snakeroot, richweed, white sanicle, jimmy weed, rayless goldenrod, burrow weed, yellow star thistle, St. Barnaby’s thistle, and Russian napweed.

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Colorado Horse Nutritional Facts

Colorado Horse Nutritional Facts

Colorado Horse Nutritional Facts

Colorado Horse Property has put together some useful Colorado horse nutritional facts for all you horse owners and horse enthusiasts out there. Remember, if you are looking for a horse property in Colorado, we have the biggest selection of listing in the entire state!

It is no secret that a horse’s digestive system is made to process large quantities of grass. This type of diet is high in fiber and water. However, the basic diet for most horses should also include good quality hay that is free of dust and mold. Of course it almost goes without saying that your horse should be provided with plenty of fresh, clean, unfrozen water at all times, even if the horse only drinks once or twice a day.

Horse Nutritional Information

Unless your veterinarian tells you otherwise, your horse should be able to graze or eat hay when they want to. However, it is important to watch your horse and make sure it is maintaining an appropriate weight. Again, your veterinarian can help you decide how to keep your horse fit and healthy. For a list of horse clinicians in Colorado, check out our Local Resources page.

Remember, you horse doesn’t have to eat grains, and sometimes its good for them to avoid such foods. Most horses don’t need the extra calories found in grains, which are high in carbohydrates. You don’t have to feed your horse extra grain in the winter to keep them warm. This is a common misconception. Hay actually produces more heat when digested than grains.

It isn’t a good idea to let your horse or pony break into the grain bin or be allowed to gorge on green pasture for the first time since the fall. Remember that if you travel with your horse, bring their food along. For some horses, you may also have to bring a supply of the water along.

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Colorado Horse Travel

Horse Travel

Horse travel is a unique challenge for horse owners.

Before doing any horse travel, go over your checklist. You don’t want to get down the road and discover you left something vital behind. Checking your list before leaving will give you time to inspect your tack and equipment. You will also have time to gather any spare items that you might need, like extra bridles and bits. Having extra is better than having none at all.

Before doing any horse travel, remember your first aid kit. Traveling with large animals can be dangerous for the animal even if you take every precaution. Make sure that all the items in your horse’s first aid kit are up to date. Also make sure that you can administer all of the items in the kit by yourself.

Anticipate driving and towing challenges. There are a few things you need to know that you can do by yourself before leaving the ranch. You should be able to change a trailer tire without assistance and correctly apply a set of jumper cables to a dead battery. Even if you have done these things before, it’s always a good idea to brush up on those skills before your trip.

Always remember to review your route. You will need to be able to identify places that would be appropriate for stopping. It is important to check on your horse several times during a long trip. Knowing places to stop is also good for refueling or even handling emergency situations. Find spots along the way with parking areas and access roads spacious enough for you to comfortably maneuver and park your horse trailer. If you are not already signed up with a company that provides roadside-assistance for towing, then you should do this before leaving. If you are looking to buy a horse trailer, check out Parker Trailers, in Parker Colorado.
 

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Horse Property Water Tank Maintenance

Water Tank Maintenance

Water tank maintenance is an important step in caring for your horses.

Water tank maintenance isn’t as easy as it sounds. If you need help, remember these few easy steps to get you started. First, the tanks need to be emptied. Then you are going to want to scrub your water tanks clean. You should rinse tanks with a ten percent bleach solution. After that, simply rinse the tanks out two more times with regular water and you are ready to go.

With that said, there are many different water tank maintenance techniques to use for your horses. Bleach can be added to the existing water in a tank. You should use regular household bleach in the recommended quantities. These can be found on the label of the product you are using. But don’t let your animals drink as soon as you apply the bleach. There should be a waiting period prior to consumption to let the chlorine dissipate. If done correctly, this can be an effective means of disinfecting your water tanks.

How long do I wait after applying bleach to the water? Following the bleach treatment, let the water stand for at least an hour before allowing your horse to drink. In Colorado, water temperatures are more on the colder side. If the water in your tank is cold, then you should increase the waiting period to at least two hours.

If you are a horse owner, then you know that water tanks need to be cleaned frequently. The goal is to avoid toxic algae buildup and unsanitary tank conditions. Make sure to follow the right instructions. Strict adherence to recommended levels of bleach and the subsequent waiting time needs to be followed in order to avoid over application. If you are looking to buy an automatic water tank system, try High Plains Cattle Supply in Platteville.
 

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Equine Herpes Virus Prevention

Equine Herpes Virus

Equine Herpes Virus is very serious.

When it comes to the equine herpes virus, you should think about what your horse is doing. Some horse owners out there may have only one horse, but many Colorado horse owners own multiple horses. In the case of multiple horses on the same ranch, you should also consider what the horses around are doing, too.

If you only have one horse, then it goes without saying that your horse is at less of a risk of contracting the equine herpes virus. Likewise, horses that only ride at your house are at less risk. Horse that leave the ranch periodically to compete and has a more social lifestyle with other horses are at a higher risk of contracting the disease.

Vaccinate your show horse at least seven days before a show. Two to three weeks before is even better. Some horses may have an active herpes infection and you might not even know. When you go to vaccinate them their body will react. Their legs will swell up and there is a chance they will develop a fever.

Know your horse’s baseline temperature. Monitor your horse’s temperature daily during and after a competition. Don’t share water troughs, buckets, or sponges. Don’t use communal hoses. This might sound stingy, but use your own and don’t share it to reduce your horse’s risk of contracting EHV.

Clean and then disinfect hay nets, bags, or troughs after use, and don’t share them between horses. The EHV virus can live in this type of environment for a time under ideal conditions. That can set you up for future infection. You can use any disinfectant. Even commercial household cleaners like bleach wipes can kill EHV.

Clean and disinfect areas in the trailer where a horse’s nose or nasal discharge might be. If you handle multiple horses, wash your hands before moving from one horse to the next. For more information on EHV, contact your local horse rescue center and talk to a professional Colorado horse handler.
 

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Exercising Your Horse

Horse Exercise

Horse exercise is important, it is no secret.

Horses are essentially grazing athletes. When you own a horse you know that exercise is a very important part in the long term care of your a horse. It is not acceptable to keep horses confined in yards or stables. At least not without providing lots of opportunities for movement. With a field full of grass and zero natural predators, domesticated horses are known to gain weight and becomes lazy.

Horses can be just like a domesticated dog or cat that doesn’t get enough exercise. It is important to make sure your horse gets the right amount of horse exercise to stay healthy. Starting with the basics, horses exercise in three different maneuvers, including yielding the hindquarters, yielding the forequarters, and backing up. Exercising your

Using these types of exercises are great for your horses health. It can also help you with your relationship with your animal. The more you direct your horse in the round pen and the more advanced the exercises get, your leadership skills increase. Horses will pick up on your confidence and show you more respect over time.

While working with your horse, you have to prove to him that you’re worthy of being a leader, by leading him safely and showing how trustworthy you are. Make your horse comfortable by doing the right thing, because your horse will be uncomfortable if you do the wrong thing.

When your horse does what you’re asking, make him/her feel comfortable. When he ignores you or acts disrespectful, make him feel uncomfortable by adding pressure. Are you looking to relocate or retire to a beautiful horse property in the great state of Colorado? Contact Colorado Horse Property to find the perfect agent for you today.

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5 Horse Clothing Cleaning Tips

horse clothing

Horse owners know how important it can be to invest in horse clothing.

Horse clothing can be a hassle to keep clean. Don’t forget that horse clothing is not disinfected when cleaned. If you do own horse-clothing, they you probably have what is called a turnout. Turnouts are not good with hot water, which is needed to disinfect and rid the material of germ build up, because of the nature of the membranes that make up their fabrics.

Horse clothing can be very expensive and the last thing you want to do is damage it. Though it takes extra time, keeping your horse clothing clean and disinfected is worth doing because it ensures your animals overall health when wearing these types of garments.

Here are a few tips on keeping your horse-clothing clean and disinfected.

  1. Know Your Horse-Clothing
    As outlined above, some horse clothing is composed of materials that are sensitive to hot water. Make sure you know your horse clothing before attempting any cleaning or disinfecting for best practices.
  2. Pine Oil
    Products containing this type of oil, such as  Pine-Sol, Real Pine, Spic and Span Pine, are great disinfectants. As long as the brand contains 80% pine oil is should be effective.
  3. Lysol
    Lysol is a phenolic disinfectant that is effective in warm water. If you are worried about damaging your horse clothing, then don’t worry about using this product.
  4. Using Bleach
    If you are going to use chlorine bleach then remember that you should always dilute it with water before adding it to the washer. Never pour bleach directly on horse clothing; it could possible ruin it.
  5. Quaternary Disinfectants
    These types of disinfectants are extremely effective in all water temperatures but are harder to find in stores. Check out Amway’s Pursue, which is specifically formulated for laundry.

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